Curiosity

As I was reading through the module on Infinite Learning I came across this passage written by Professor Stephens:

“Beginning this learner’s journey in library school should be a given. The role of the LIS instructor becomes guide, not keeper of knowledge. Students could also set aside part of their schoolwork time to explore beyond class content. “Follow your curiosity,” is my answer when students ask me what emerging ideas and tech they should focus on. This emphasis on learning will carry our graduates forward into their positions.”

I love how he points out that the professor’s job is to foster their student’s curiosity. It is through curiosity the we will learn the most and be given the innate desire to learn. As we are nearing the end of this semester I am realizing one of the reasons I have enjoyed this class so much is the fact that Professor Stephens has given us a chance as students to take our own ideas and fly with them. We show our curiosity by going the extra mile to post and discuss with one another in the tribes section. I think that I have learned more through the tribes, than through any other means simply, because I am interested.

The idea of allowing students to be curious is not something that is just for the post-secondary world; it is also for K-12 education. When I teach my elementary students, I love to give them free time to explore anything they would like on Encyclopedia Britannica online. It is a great way to find out what interests the students and they get a chance to play around with the features. Many of them end up watching videos, but a few of them will read articles. As the students are given free range they are learning how to use a piece of technology by discovery which, to echo Professor Stephens, will carry them forward into a life of ever changing technology without fear of trying something new.

Here is a short TEDtalk which summarizes why curiosity is important in education:

 

Stephens, M. (2011). Lessons from learning 2.0. Retrieved from http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2011/11/opinion/michael-stephens/lessons-from-learning-2-0-office-hours/

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